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May 22, 2017 / weavingschool

Meeting the Challenge

Los Angeles ladies are up for any challenge. In our (what is now low tech) world, adding electronics to fiber art works is a strange and new thing, but 15 ladies, members of Wearable Arts Connection (and some with joint membership in Surface Art Association) got their foot in the door of electronic textiles. We started with one of the oldest processes, wet felting, by making a nuno felted scarf. The warm California sun dried the pieces over lunch then we added an led light by stitching a circuit with conductive yarn. From scrolling the art work on their web pages it is clear that the ladies are already creating beautiful pieces. I can’t wait to see what they do next.

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Loading supplies into a members house. A great location for an outdoor workshop on a beautiful sunny day.

May 21, 2017 / weavingschool

Wearable Arts Connection

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Members in line for show and tell.

LaLa Land is a great place to do a workshop. So much to see and do here. The cactus in full bloom and different smells of plants than we have in East Tennessee greeted me while walking through the botanical gardens in Clairmont when I first arrived – a wonderful way to get jet lag behind me.
I’m working with the creative ladies of the Wearable Art Connection who are open to all things new. Yesterday I presented a slide show combining the newest technologies available to sewers with the ancient technologies still in use in the countries I’ve been lucky enough to visit. I shared my journey into this new world and encouraged them to get started on their own path.
Today we will get our hands wet in the felting process then stitch on some lights for an extra bit of glamour.

April 26, 2017 / weavingschool

Smoky Mountain Fiber Arts Festival

Scarves, vessels, curtains and electronics classes this year. Plus animals, Girl Scouts, great food and amazing shopping. Put this on your to do list for next year.

March 29, 2017 / weavingschool

Walking on Blue

I’ve embarked on a plein air project. It all started when my husband got in the bull dozier and went to war on the privet encircling the woods on our farm. I see such amazing things on my walks around the farm, but now that he has opened up the woods I can extend my walks through the woods instead of around them. The forces of nature are even more evident inside the woods along multiple new paths. Gigantic trees darkened at the base with moss and fallen ones on their way to return back into the earth, vines the size of a man’s wrist and of seemingly unlimited height tangled up into the trees some with the hairy clue that they are poison ivy, grey kudzu vines awaiting their spring growth spurt, small baby trees climbing their way to the sky, mosses, lichens, leaves of all sizes, toadstools, spider webs, occasional bugs, the one early asparagus that didn’t quite make it past the last frost, and new paths my son has cleared into the two farm ponds left over from long ago barite mining.
I can’t wait to get into the woods every day. In this early spring it is like walking on a blue carpet with so many tiny four petal blue flowers underfoot. I’ve packed a backpack with needed supplies to card, spin, weave, and felt wool to the colors that surround me on these walks.

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March 27, 2017 / weavingschool

Florida Tropical Weavers Guild

 

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Talk about a great place to teach, Florida Tropical Weavers Guild Conference near Orlando is it. I introduced some new folks to electronic textiles. They all wanted to try something new and we did. Several had never felted before so the challenge was to learn two entirely different crafts in one weekend. Must be something in the water. We even had a great time showing off our dancing lady pins complete with lights at the fashion show.

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March 10, 2017 / weavingschool

When your back is turned

It is amazing what kids can do when you give them directions than turn them loose. Here’s what the kids at Silverdale Baptist Elementary School in Chattanooga, TN did on their Appalachian Art Day Festival. I showed them how to weave on the floor loom then let a few weave while the rest of the classes saw samples and other processes that turn fibers into clothing. Clothes don’t come from the store after all, cotton is picked, wool is sheered then fibers are carded, spun, and woven.

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While my back was turned the kids made up their own system

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Finished weaving

February 22, 2017 / weavingschool

Much can be accomplished in a weekend

Especially at John C Campbell Folk School
This past weekend, I taught a round robin plain weave class proving that “plain weave does not have to be so plain.” Of course the Folk School brings out the best in folks so the students were able to weave 8 different versions of plain weave on six different looms and do lots of warping to boot.
Here are just a few of the samples just waiting for full sized projects.